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Friday, May 14, 2010

Facilitated Leader

Voice is the key in todays and yesterdays world. The concept of facilitation is as old as the stars and modern as web2.0. For a more detailed rendering of the concept I offer "The Facilitated Leader" for your enjoyment.


And a famous friend of mine constructed The Support Circle as a process that can be used in your living room or in your cloud.

22 comments:

  1. Hand here are a few web sites about facilitation:
    Facilitator resources:

    http://www.thiagi.com/tips.html

    http://learningforsustainability.net/tools/facilitation.php

    http://www.impactalliance.org/ev_en.php?ID=3779_201&ID2=DO_TOPIC

    http://consensus.fsu.edu/ResourceCtr/practitioner_helps/techs.html

    http://www.infodesign.com.au/usabilityresources/facilitationtechniques

    http://www2.hawaii.edu/~jharris/facilitation.html

    http://www.facilitate.com/support/facilitator-toolkit/meeting-design-tips.html

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  2. Buzan in "The Mind Map Book" opens the world of Mind Mapping!

    How to do a Mind Map
    Mind mapping (or concept mapping) involves writing down a central idea and thinking up new and related ideas which radiate out from the centre. By focusing on key ideas written down in your own words, and then looking for branches out and connections between the ideas, you are mapping knowledge in a manner which will help you understand and remember new information.

    Look for relationships
    Use lines, colors, arrows, branches or some other way of showing connections between the ideas generated on your mind map. These relationships may be important in you understanding new information or in constructing a structured essay plan. By personalizing the map with your own symbols and designs you will be constructing visual and meaningful relationships between ideas which will assist in your recall and understanding.

    Draw quickly on unlined paper without pausing, judging or editing
    All of these things promote linear thinking and the idea of mind mapping is to think creatively and in a non-linear manner. There will be plenty of time for modifying the information later on but at this stage it is important to get every possibility into the mind map. Sometimes it is one of those obscure possibilities that may become the key to your knowledge of a topic.

    Write down key ideas
    Some students find that using capital letters encourages them to get down only the key points. Capitals are also easier to read in a diagram. You may, however, wish to write down some explanatory notes in lower case. Some students do this when they revisit the mind map at a later date while others write in such things as assessment criteria in this way.

    Put main idea in the centre
    Most students find it useful to turn their page on the side and do a mind map in "landscape" style. With the main idea or topic in the middle of the page this gives the maximum space for other ideas to radiate out from the centre.

    Leave lots of space
    Some of the most useful mind maps are those which are added to over a period of time. After the initial drawing of the mind map you may wish to highlight things, add information or add questions for the duration of a subject right up until exam time. For this reason it is a good idea to leave lots of space.

    These hints on how to construct a mind map have been adapted from the work of Tony Buzan and others who have promoted mind mapping as a learning and thinking tool. For a full explanation of the mind mapping technique see Buzan, T. (1991). The mind map book . New York: Penguin.

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  3. This is a great site to learn much including how best to use Google docshttp://the8blog.wordpress.com/2010/05/18/collaboration-through-google-docs/

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  4. http://the8blog.wordpress.com/2010/05/18/collaboration-through-google-docs/

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  5. Mentorship refers to a personal developmental relationship in which a more experienced or more knowledgeable person helps a less experienced or less knowledgeable person. The receiver of mentorship was traditionally referred to as a protégé, or apprentice but with the institutionalization of mentoring the more neutral word "mentee" was invented and is widely used today.
    There are several definitions of mentoring in the literature. Foremost, mentoring involves communication and is relationship based. In the organizational setting, mentoring can take many forms. One definition of the many that has been proposed, is "Mentoring is a process for the informal transmission of knowledge, social capital, and the psychosocial support perceived by the recipient as relevant to work, career, or professional development;mentoring entails informal communication, usually face-to-face and during a sustained period of time, between a person who is perceived to have greater relevant knowledge, wisdom, or experience (the mentor) and a person who is perceived to have less (the protégé)" (Bozeman, Feeney, 2007).

    **************************************************************************
    Function: noun
    Etymology: Latin, from Greek Mentōr
    Date: 1616
    1 capitalized : a friend of Odysseus entrusted with the education of Odysseus' son Telemachus
2 a : a trusted counselor or guide b :

    From Betsy, Sandy and Soleil

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  6. http://www.sonic.net/~mfreeman/mentor/mentsupp.htm

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  7. p://www.multiculturaladvantage.com/leader/mentor/read/Ten-Rules-for-Mentoring-Relationships.asp
    Very useful and an easy-read for mentoring.

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  8. Mentoring is a developmental partnership through which one person shares knowledge, skills, information, and perspective to foster the personal and professional growth of someone else.

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  9. http://polaris.gseis.ucla.edu/jrichardson/documents/mentor.htm

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  10. The Top 5 Ways to get Mentoring Done!

    Use formal structured programs
    Use informal Mentoring
    Make Mentoring Cross-Cultural
    Measure Success and follow up
    Publicize the Success of Mentoring programs

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  11. The story of Mentor comes from Homer’s Odyssey. When Odysseus, king of Ithaca, leaves to fight in the Trojan War, he entrusts the care of his household to Mentor, who serves as teacher and overseer of Odysseus’ son, Telemachus. After the war, Odysseus is condemned to wander vainly for 10 years in his attempt to return home. In time, Telemachus, now grown, goes in search of his father. Athena, Goddess of War and patroness of the arts and industry, assumes the form of Mentor and accompanies Telemachus on his quest. Eventually, father and son are reunited and together they cast down would-be usurpers of Odysseus’ throne and of Telemachus’ birthright. In time, the word mentor became synonymous with trusted advisor, friend, teacher, and wise person. History offers many examples of helpful mentoring relationships, such as Socrates and Plato, Hyden and Beethoven, and Freud and Jung. Mentoring is a fundamental form of human development where one person invests time, energy, and personal know-how assisting the growth and ability of another person. History and legend record the deeds of princes and kings, but in a democracy each of us also has a birthright, which is to be all that we can be. Mentors are the special people in our lives who, through their deeds and work, help us to move toward fulfilling that potential.

    Shea, Gordon F.; Woodbury, Debbie (Editor); Pittsley, Brenda (Editor). Mentoring : How to Develop Successful Mentor Behaviors.
    Menlo Park, CA, USA: Course Technology Crisp, 2001. p 11.
    http://site.ebrary.com/lib/fgils/Doc?id=10058896&ppg=11
    Copyright © 2001. Course Technology Crisp. All rights reserved.

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  12. Here is the Head Start mentoring program website:
    http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/Professional%20Development/Organizational%20Development/Mentoring/prodev_art_00006_060205.html

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  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  14. http://www.texascollaborative.org/StacyMayo/section4.htm

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  15. http://www.usphs.gov/corpslinks/pharmacy/mentor/MENTORROLES.html

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  16. I found this concept of group mentoring quite interesting, particularly on the heels of some of discussion this morning about economics and post-beauracratic society. Promoted as a faster, more efficient and more economic form of mentoring...what happens to the original focus of mentoring which is the relationship itself. Check out the link below and other sites about group mentoring.

    http://www.workforce.com/section/11/article/23/89/50.html

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  17. Do all the good you can
    By all the means you can
    In all the ways you can
    In all the places you can
    To all the people you can
    As long as ever you can
    ~ John Wesley

    True heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic. It is not the urge to surpass all at whatever cost, but the urge to serve others at whatever cost." ~ Arthur Ashe

    Unless we think of others and do something for them, we miss one of the greatest sources of happiness. ~ Ray Lyman

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  18. The story of Mentor comes from Homer’s Odyssey. When Odysseus, king of Ithaca, leaves to fight in the Trojan War, he entrusts the care of his household to Mentor, who serves as teacher and overseer of Odysseus’ son, Telemachus. After the war, Odysseus is condemned to wander vainly for 10 years in his attempt to return home. In time, Telemachus, now grown, goes in search of his father. Athena, Goddess of War and patroness of the arts and industry, assumes the form of Mentor and accompanies Telemachus on his quest. Eventually, father and son are reunited and together they cast down would-be usurpers of Odysseus’ throne and of Telemachus’ birthright. In time, the word mentor became synonymous with trusted advisor, friend, teacher, and wise person. History offers many examples of helpful mentoring relationships, such as Socrates and Plato, Hyden and Beethoven, and Freud and Jung. Mentoring is a fundamental form of human development where one person invests time, energy, and personal know-how assisting the growth and ability of another person. History and legend record the deeds of princes and kings, but in a democracy each of us also has a birthright, which is to be all that we can be. Mentors are the special people in our lives who, through their deeds and work, help us to move toward fulfilling that potential.

    Shea, Gordon F.; Woodbury, Debbie (Editor); Pittsley, Brenda (Editor). Mentoring : How to Develop Successful Mentor Behaviors.
    Menlo Park, CA, USA: Course Technology Crisp, 2001. p 11.
    http://site.ebrary.com/lib/fgils/Doc?id=10058896&ppg=11
    Copyright © 2001. Course Technology Crisp. All rights reserved.

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  19. Thanks Lara for the HS mentoring website....I am going to go and visit that later!!

    Betsy

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  20. mentoring is an experienced person helping others cope with daily life,

    we found this website helpful as it gives tips for practicing

    http://www.mentoring.org/find_resources/elements_of_effective_practice/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentorship#Mentoring_Techniques

    www.gov.ns.ca/.../Mentor/Guide%20for%20Mentoring_Be%20a%20Mentor.pdf

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  21. The story of Mentor comes from Homer’s Odyssey. When Odysseus, king of Ithaca, leaves to fight in the Trojan War, he entrusts the care of his household to Mentor, who serves as teacher and overseer of Odysseus’ son, Telemachus. After the war, Odysseus is condemned to wander vainly for 10 years in his attempt to return home. In time, Telemachus, now grown, goes in search of his father. Athena, Goddess of War and patroness of the arts and industry, assumes the form of Mentor and accompanies Telemachus on his quest. Eventually, father and son are reunited and together they cast down would-be usurpers of Odysseus’ throne and of Telemachus’ birthright. In time, the word mentor became synonymous with trusted advisor, friend, teacher, and wise person. History offers many examples of helpful mentoring relationships, such as Socrates and Plato, Hyden and Beethoven, and Freud and Jung. Mentoring is a fundamental form of human development where one person invests time, energy, and personal know-how assisting the growth and ability of another person. History and legend record the deeds of princes and kings, but in a democracy each of us also has a birthright, which is to be all that we can be. Mentors are the special people in our lives who, through their deeds and work, help us to move toward fulfilling that potential.

    Shea, Gordon F.; Woodbury, Debbie (Editor); Pittsley, Brenda (Editor). Mentoring : How to Develop Successful Mentor Behaviors.
    Menlo Park, CA, USA: Course Technology Crisp, 2001. p 11.
    http://site.ebrary.com/lib/fgils/Doc?id=10058896&ppg=11
    Copyright © 2001. Course Technology Crisp. All rights reserved.

    ReplyDelete
  22. http://www.blessingwhite.com/helping_others_succeed_gc.asp?gclid=CPH20OSc4aECFYNd5Qod9DjKIw
    mentoring can be complex at times but it is necessary in our lives it is a way to help others and learn about ourselves

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